Tuesday, April 15, 2008

What Is Your Theological Worldview?

I've retaken the Theological Worldview Test, and these were the results:

Evangelical Holiness/Wesleyan: 93%
Emergent/Postmodern: 82%
Charismatic/Pentecostal: 68%
Neo orthodox: 64%
Classical Liberal: 61%
Reformed Evangelical: 57%
Fundamentalist: 43%
Roman Catholic: 39%
Modern Liberal: 25%

I take this test every year, and these were my results two years ago:

Evangelical Holiness/Wesleyan: 93%
Charismatic/Pentecostal: 71%
Neo orthodox: 68%
Fundamentalist: 61%
Classical Liberal: 54%
Reformed Evangelical: 54%
Emergent/Postmodern: 50%
Roman Catholic: 43%
Modern Liberal: 36%

So the major change over the past two years is that I have become far more Postmodern. I figured that this might happen after writing theology essays for commissioning in the past few weeks. I found that my concept of the Kingdom of God, life in community, and evangelism were heavily derived from Brian McLaren and N.T. Wright.

After more than 2 and 1/2 years in seminary, I recently asked my wife if she had spotted any major changes in my theology. She said, "Many people go to seminary and stop believing in Jesus. I was worried about that when you started school. But you went to seminary and started believing in social justice."

I think that that's true. It's a libertarian vision of social justice, but it's definitely social justice. I'm far less inclined to conceptualize salvation as individualistic and holiness as personal and now more likely to emphasize the transformation of entire societies into the Kingdom of God. I'm also inclined to envision evangelism as incarnational and outreach as central to Christian life.

Much of this change in my thinking can be attributed to two spiritual mentors, Hugo Magallanes and Brian Russell.

15 comments:

Dan Trabue said...

Interesting self-evaluation on your part, John.

Mine I think is similar to how it turned out before. I'm still complaining because there is no anabaptist option here, which probably better matches my views than "emergent."

Emergent/Postmodern
64%
Neo orthodox
61%
Evangelical Holiness/Wesleyan
61%
Classical Liberal
54%
Modern Liberal
43%
Roman Catholic
39%
Charismatic/Pentecostal
36%
Reformed Evangelical
21%
Fundamentalist
11%

Jeff the Baptist said...

You appear to be more postmodern/emergent and less fundamentalist. I haven't taken it since I came out as Wesleyan in 2006 despite knowing nothing about Wesleyan theology.

klaxophone said...

"...you went to seminary and started believing in social justice." "So the major change over the past two years is that I have become far more Postmodern." "I'm also inclined to envision evangelism as incarnational..."

Leave the gun; take the cannoli.

John said...

Leave the gun; take the cannoli

I know it's a Godfather reference, but it's been years since I've seen the film. Could you put this in context?

klaxophone said...

I guess I mean, in all good humor, you should abandon post-modern language like 'envision evangelism as incarnational' while retaining the commitment to social justice. Or maybe words like 'incarnational' are temporary artifacts of the seminary that will disappear on their own in time. :-)

Ken L. Hagler said...

Hugo and I were at Asbury back in the early 90's. I was really impressed with him then and I'm glad to hear of his continued influence.

I came out Wesleyan a few years ago, I wonder if I've changed...doubt it.

~c. said...

I'm a Christian.

Gord said...

I am crious, what do you describe as libertarian social justice?

I ask because in many ways my vision of social justice (which is firmly social democratic) is often at odds with libertarianism as I understand it.

gavin richardson said...

i would like to thank the academy for helping me to corrupt john & bring him over to the darkside. &:~D

John said...

klaxophone wrote:

Or maybe words like 'incarnational' are temporary artifacts of the seminary that will disappear on their own in time.

Heh. Probably.

John said...

Gord wrote:

I am crious, what do you describe as libertarian social justice?

By libertarian social justice, I mean that the Church has an obligation to address social evils directly. For example, if the Church responds to poverty by lobbying for state-run social welfare programs, then the Church is avoiding its responsibility. A more authentic response by the Church would be to directly aid the poor.

John said...

i would like to thank the academy for helping me to corrupt john & bring him over to the darkside. &:~D

Yeah, my immediate thought after taking this test was "I've crossed over to the darkside." And Yoda's ominous warning, "Once to the darkside you cross, forever will it dominate your destiny."

John Wilks said...

Evangelical Holiness/Wesleyan

96%

Neo orthodox

79%

Roman Catholic

64%

Charismatic/Pentecostal

61%

Emergent/Postmodern

61%

Reformed Evangelical

57%

Classical Liberal

54%

Fundamentalist

46%

Modern Liberal

18%


Pretty close to years past for me.

Ken Lowery said...

I think we have to duel at dawn, John.

Emergent/Postmodern
79%
Evangelical Holiness/Wesleyan
71%
Modern Liberal
68%
Classical Liberal
64%
Neo orthodox
54%
Roman Catholic
46%
Charismatic/Pentecostal
43%
Reformed Evangelical
18%
Fundamentalist
0

JD said...

First column is the type, second percent from October 2006, third is percent from April 2008, and last column is the change.

Evangelical Holiness/Wesleyan 75%79% +4%
Roman Catholic 71% 79% +8%
Neo orthodox 68% 68% 0%
Emergent/Postmodern 64% 46% (18%)
Classical Liberal 57% 46% (11%)
Fundamentalist 39% 50% +11%
Reformed Evangelical 36% 43% +7%
Charismatic/Pentecostal 32% 36% +4%
Modern Liberal 29% 14% (15%)

I find the numbers as interesting as John did. Due to my learnings over the last few years, things have moved a little, although it may not be something to write home to mom about.

John,

I appreciate your definition of libertarian social justice. I am starting to move toward that too, mostly due to the influene for my pastor. He is a great example of a libertarian with a social justice focus.

PAX
JD